On Sunday 8th July, 38 students from 17 countries made their way to the beautiful city of Tallinn. The round of introductions already told us a lot about the individuals, much more than they intended. On Monday 9th July, armed with a little information and lots of things to think about, from the earlier sessions, the students set off, in their teams, to collect sea water samples (Photo on the left). All managed to complete the task but for some the waters were muddied, in more ways than one. Finding out the next day, Tuesday 10th, that salinity measurements are not trivial was a rich learning experience and shed light on many of the pitfalls awaiting the unsuspecting sampler/analyst.

These issues were then further embedded and clarified in various lectures (parts of the resource or process requirements of the ISO/IEC 17025:2017 namely chapters 7.1, 6.1 to 6.6, 7.1-7.8). Already on Tuesday evening the various laboratories (TEAM ONE, JCPT, K2Y, Cool Lab, Djam, We Click!, Elk Analytical, G.I.M.M., ISO CHEM and MONALU) had clearly defined roles and responsibilities for each of their staff. This was about to be tested when they got started on their measurements in the laboratory on Thursday afternoon, following a review of basic lab skills the day before.

Once in the lab the mixture of more and less experienced people really proved to be invaluable for both. It was really lovely to see the exchange of advice, with younger people sharing their intimate knowledge of software such as excel and what it can do and slightly older people providing perspective on what’s really important with respect to fitness for purpose decisions etc. (Ready for the lab! Photo on the right)

When the students had completed five full days of the summer school and were unwinding a little bit in Mektory’s lovely garden, sharing national food, drink, language tips, jokes, songs, (tall) tales from their countries, the idea of filming a mini ‘TV’ novella on Lab Safety was born. It just shows that free time is needed for creative juices to flow!

Saturday the 14th July was simply amazing. From learning that Estonians were Vikings too and what that actually meant, to learning some basic Viking skills (axe throwing and long bow shooting), followed by a hike to the magical Saula Springs, canoeing or long boat river excursion (Photo on the left) and finally ancient singing and dancing games (intermingled with dinner) left all feeling physically exhausted but mentally refreshed and ready for the World Cup Final on Sunday (preceded by a guided tour of Tallinn) and needless to say, another week of interactive learning.

 

On July 09, 2018 the 11th MSC Summer School started in the Mectory facility of the Tallinn University of Technology (Tallinn, Estonia).

Four students from the University of Tartu take part in the summer school. Three students are from the EACH programme: Angelique Dafun, Mark Justine Zapanta and Nikola Obradović. One student, Ernesto De Jesus Zapata Flores, is from the AMS programme. (Photo on the left, taken by Mark Justine Zapanta)

As in previous years, a core aim of the Summer school is teaching measurement science (metrology) topics related to analytical chemistry using active learning (“learning by doing”) approaches, as far as possible. Thus, efforts are made for increasing the share of discussions, hands-on work, teamwork. A key activity of the summer school is the contest of student teams (setting up virtual laboratories and interacting with customers), which tests their knowledge and skills in all areas of metrology in chemistry (Photo on the right).

We wish exciting and enjoyable Summer school to all participants!

 

On June 08, 2018 the master thesis defence of the second cohort of the EACH programme took place at Uppsala University! Thi Duong Bui, Anton Roshchin, Duc Khanh Tho Nguyen, Ruixin Huang, Alisija Prakapaitė, Kalliroi Sdougkou, Ajit Jung Karki and Snežana Đorđević successfully defended their master’s theses.

The topics of the theses embraced a wide area of modern biomed- and environmental analytical problems (MS imaging in biomedical research, LC-MS analysis of drugs in different matrices, evaluation of molecular markers for determination of efficiency in drinking water treatment processes, studies of photosynthesis, etc). All of them featured the use of highly sophisticated analytical instrumentation, such as high-resolution MS, imaging systems, etc. This choice of topics is largely directed by the world-famous biomedical analysis research direction at Uppsala University led by prof. Jonas Bergquist.

The average quality level of the theses was found to be very high by the defence committee members.

Congratulations to all of you!

(On photo from the left: Tho, Kalliroi, Alisija, Snežana, Ivo, Jonas, Duong, Ajit, Anton, Ruixin)

 

University of TartuIn a recent ranking of universities in the “New Europe” – the 13 countries that have become EU members since 2004 – carried out by the Times higher Education, the University of Tartu was ranked as No 1!

University of Tartu is followed by the Cyprus University of Technology and University of Cyprus. The Charles University in Prague comes is ranked fourth.

The list includes 53 universities in total and uses the conventional methodology of THE World University Rankings.

 

U_MOOC_Countries_of_Participants_2018On Tuesday, March 27, 2018 the web course Estimation of Measurement Uncertainty in Chemical Analysis was launched the fifth time as a MOOC (Massive Online Open Course)!

Currently more than 450 participants from 70 countries are registered! As was the case in the previous years, the majority of participants are from analytical laboratories. This once again demonstrates the continuing need for training in measurement uncertainty estimation for practicing analytical chemists.

The full course material is accessible from the web page https://sisu.ut.ee/measurement/uncertainty. As is usual, some developments and improvements have been made to the course material. in particular, the description of course organisatsion was improved; more explanations and examples were added on random and systematic effects within short and long term; the typical requirements for determining repeatability and within-lab reproducibility have been clearly outlined; more explanations on the main principles of modifying a model in a modelling approach have been given, together with an example. Some changes are still in the pipeline.

The course materials include videos, schemes, calculation files and numerous self-tests (among them also full-fledged measurement uncertainty calculation exercises). In order to pass the course the registered participants have to pass six graded tests and get higher than 50% score from each of tehm. These tests are available to registered participants via the Moodle e-learning platform.

 

It was the spring of 2011 when I decided to apply to the AMS programme. If I remember correctly, the decision was based on my gut feeling and it was a right one. AMS was related to “perceived” world more than many other programmes in the faculty of science and technology as was also stated in the slogan “bridging the gap between measurements and society”.

5 years after the graduation I am still thankful for taking the journey, and I wanted to remind to myself and to others the three aspects that distinguished the programme from many others.

1) Combination of science and society. If you have the opportunity to combine your own favourite scientific topic (in my case biochemistry and measurement science) with knowledge about requirements related to law, regulations, and standards one has the possibility to give your thoughts a new perspective. It was beneficial for me in the labour market – there are not many people who know both of these aspects simultaneously which makes an AMS graduate a valuable specialist, mostly in private sector, but also in “pure” science. (I am currently working as a quality assurance specialist at Kevelt AS, which is a pharmaceutical manufacturing company in Estonia.)

2) Improvement of communication skills. There was a lot of group work during the studies, which improved my social skills. There is nothing more important than human relations! We had the possibility to study with people from Uzbekistan, Latvia, China, United Kingdom, Ukraine, Jordan, Romania, France, Turkey, and many more. This enabled to study about other cultures, but also how to communicate with people from other cultures.

3) The inspiring (!) lecturers. Their eyes were sparkling when they spoke about their topics so vividly. I believe that people are best at what they really love to do and I aim for the same in my professional career.

I could not thank Prof. Ivo Leito more for such an important contribution to our (students´) lives as leading the AMS programme. He is passionate about what he is teaching and sincerely interested in answering the endless questions, giving us the opportunity to find our better selves in the progress of studies.

 

It is a pleasure to announce that the admission period is again open for the Applied Measurement Science master’s programme!

It is a programme in a field where there is a serious shortage of competent people all over the world. The reason is that the importance of measurements, tests and chemical analyses is constantly increasing. It has recently been claimed, and rightly so, that we are living in a Golden Age of Measurement Science!

It is also the pleasure to let you know that this is the 10th full admission cycle of the AMS programme! Ten years is sufficiently long time to take a brief look back.

During the ten years altogether 55 people have successfully graduated from the AMS programme. Our graduates are enjoying a variety of interesting careers: setting up a contract analytical laboratory, redefining the way people interpret and measure pH, developing new ion sources for mass spectrometry, working as vice-director at National Measurement Institute, Managing IT Infrastructure projects, etc. A longer list of positions held by AMS alumni can be seen in the AMS Career Outlook page.

We have every reason to believe that the row of exciting achievements will continue and we wish you all the success in applying to the programme!

Admission will be open until Mar 15, 2018.

 

Measurements and computations of acidity and basicity of strong and superstrong acids (superacids) and bases in organic solvents is among the core research topics at the UT Chair of Analytical Chemistry. In a recent works (Chem. Sci. 2017, 8, 6964-6973.,    J. Phys. Org. Chem. 2013, 26, 162-170.,    J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 735–743.,    J. Phys. Chem. A 2016, 120, 3663–3669.) the behavior of a number of acids – ranging from weak to strong and superstrong acids (superacids) was examined in three solvents (water, acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane) and in the gas phase. Acidities (pKa values) of a number of different acids including the well-known superacids trifluoromethanesulfonic (triflic) acid, bis-trifylimide (Tf2NH), etc as well as the carborane superacids (closo-carborane superacids), but also weaker acids (HCl, acetic acid, phenol) etc are examined in the above mentioned solvents. pKa of superacids are not easy to find in literature. Trends of acidity changes on moving from water to the gas phase depnding on the on the nature of the acidity centre and the molecular structure are analyzed. The acidity orders are different in water, MeCN, DCE and the gas phase. In some cases – notably, the hydrohalogenic acids HCl, HBr and HI – the differences are dramatic. These three acids are among the strongest known acids in water but have modest acidity in the gas phase. In contrast, 9‑C6F5‑Octafluorofluorene, a weak acid in water (approximately of the strength of phenol) is quite strong acid in the gas phase, beating any of the hydrohalogenic acids.

It is demonstrated that the decisive factor for behavior of the acids when transferring between different media is the extent of charge delocalization in the anion and that the recently introduced WAPS parameter in spite of its simplicity enables interpretation of the trends in the majority of cases. The acidity data together with references to specific publications are collected in the Table below.

Table of pKa valuesa of acids in different solvents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acid

H2O

MeCN

DCEb

GP

GP

 

pKa

pKa

pKa

pKa

GA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fluoradene

11.1

23.90

12.5

238

324.9

Para-Toluenesulfonamide, 4-CH3-C6H4-SO2-NH2

10.21

26.87

15.6

245

334.0

9‑C6F5‑Octafluorofluorene

10.1

18.88

9.0c

220

300.6

Phenol

10.00

29.14

19.6

251

342.3

(C6F5)2CHCN

9.5

21.10

10.3

229

312.4

C6F5CH(CN)COOEt

5.89

17.75

7.5c

230

313.5

2,4-Dinitrophenol, 2,4-(NO2)2-C6H3OH

4.09

16.66

4.7

226

308.6

(CF3)3COH

5.40

20.55

9.2

238

324.0

Acetic acid, CH3COOH

4.76

23.51

15.5

250

341.1

(4-CF3-C6F4)2CHCN

4.4

16.13

6.0

221

302.1

4-NO2-C6H4-CH(CN)2

2.3

11.61

0.3

220

299.5

Saccharin

1.80

14.57

5.5

232

315.9

Picric acid, 2,4,6-Trinitrophenol

0.40

11.00

0.0

219

299.0

(4-NO2-C6H4-SO2)2NH

<-1

8.19

-3.9c

213

291.1

(CF3SO2)3C6H2OH

-2.0

4.48

-6.6c

208

284.2

(CF3SO2)2NH

<-2

0.3d

-11.9c

210

286.9f

(C2F5SO2)2NH

<-2

-0.10

-12.4c

208

283.7

Cyanoform, (CN)3CH

-5.1

5.1

-6.4c

216

294.8

Triflicid, trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, CF3SO2OH

-14.7g

0.70

-11.3c

215

292.7g

Hydrochloric acid, hydrogen chloride, HCl

-5.9g

10.30

0.2c

241

328.1g

Hydrobromic acid, hydrogen bromide, HBr

-8.8g

5.5

-4.4c

233

318.3g

Sulfuric acid, H2SO4

-9e

8.7d

-2.2c

221

301.2f

Pentacyanopropene

-9.02

-2.80

-15.3c

196

267.2

Hydroiodic acid, hydrogen iodide, HI

-9.5g

2.8

-7.3c

227

309.3g

CB11H12H, unsubstituted closo-Carborane superacid

-25h

-17h

-25f

195

266.5f

B12H12H2, unsubstituted closo-Dodecaborate superacid

-17h

-9h

-17f

196

267.5f

CB11F12H, perfluoro-closo-Carborane superacid

-47h

-39h

-47f

156

212.8f

B12F12H2, perfluoro-closo-Dodecaborate superacid

-45h

-37h

-45f

156

213.4f

 

 

 

 

 

 

a Values from http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/poc.2946 unless noted otherwise. There are numerous comments and details to these values. Please see the original articles for details and comments. GA values are given in kcal mol-1. pKa values in the gas phase are approximate and have been obtained from the GA values by dividing with 1.364 kcal mol-1. b Ion pair pKa values relative to picric acid in 1,2-dichloroethane. c Values from https://doi.org/10.1039/c7sc01424d. d Values from http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo101409p. e Value from E. V. Anslyn, D. A. Dougherty, Modern Physical Organic Chemistry, University Science Books, Sausalito, 2006. f Values from http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp506485x. DCE values have been recalculated from absolute to relative, in order to be comparable with the rest. g Values from http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpca.6b02253. h Crude estimates from DCE data by considering that bulk water is by 53 kcal mol-1 more basic than bulk DCE and bulk acetonitrile is by 42 kcal mol-1 more basic than bulk DCE.

 

(This post was initially posted on Feb 2, 2013. On Jan 15, 2017 a number values in the table have been replaced by more reliable values from more recent publications. In addition, some compounds were added to the in order to give a fuller picture. The changes concern only the table. The image has not been changed and should be viewed as illustrative)

_END_

This is a Golden Age of Measurement ScienceThe American Chemical Society (the world’s largest scientific society by membership!) has published a document titled Top Ten Trends Driving Science, which summarizes in an intelligent and engaging way the main processes and trends in the contemporary society that drive the scientific research. The explanations are supported by numerous quotes from leading scientists.

Of specific interest for our study programme is the trend No 2: Big data is more essential than ever, is which supported by quote from Jonathan Sweedler, Editor-in-Chief of Analytical Chemistry, stating among other things: This is a Golden Age of Measurement Science!

All the best wishes to all measurement scientists – both chemical and physical – everywhere in the world!

 

Huian_Liu_in_lab_with_GC_instrumentThe master theses of the EACH programme have usually high practical value. However, this does not prevent them to lead to cutting edge scientific results.

The master thesis of Huian Liu – EACH 2017 graduate from the Lyon study track – titled Gas separation by high pressure gas chromatography using monolithic columns is a good example. At its core the thesis was devoted to investigating the behavior of monolithic GC columns in separation of small hydrocarbons for achieving high efficiency and short analysis time – an important issue in oil refineries.

As an additional value, however, it involved experimenting with a novel detector – vacuum UV absorption detector (VUV detector). VUV detector is an emerging detector in GC, enabling simultaneous detection, identification and quantitation of analytes.

In chromatography there are detectors of two response types – concentration-sensitive and mass-sensitive detectors. The response type is important in planning separation, and especially in quantitation. As a result of Huian’s work it was firmly established that VUV detector is a concentration-sensitive, not mass-sensitive detector. This result was considered scientifically so significant that it was accepted for publication by the number one chromatography journal in the world – Journal of Chromatography A (!): Huian Liu, Guy Raffin, Guillaume Trutt, Jérôme Randon J. Chrom. A, 2017, 1530, 171–175. Congratulations to Huian and the team!

Huian is continuing his studies as a PhD student at UCBL.

 

(Photo: Huian Liu in lab with the GC instrument)

 

Monika_Sandy_Rudolf_MarkoThis June and September, the first intake of students graduated successfully from the EACH programme (a sister programme of AMS). See the graduation blogposts at Uppsala, Lyon and Åbo.

Just few months later, 14 out of our 17 fresh graduates have already obtained positions! Some work in the professional/industrial field, some in academic field. Their jobs range from research assistant at a university to project manager at an international corporation. Several have chosen to continue their studies as PhD students. The reflections of some of our graduates on the programme are here:

Marko_Jovanovic

 

Marko, working as project leader in the Industrial Development at Servier (France), writes:
I have spent amazing 2 years in EACH Programme, that represents a perfect balance between studying and travelling. Throughout this period, we had the opportunity to be educated by the experts in the field of Analytical Chemistry. The study track – Industrial Analysis held in France gave me an important insight into the field that I was not so familiar with before I had the opportunity to spend 6 months of the Programme among well-educated and highly-skilled professionals in the company Axel’One, where I was doing my internship. Since Axel’One is a collaborative research platform, I was engaged in several different projects with different companies. This enabled me not only to enrich my knowledge and skills in applied analytical chemistry, but also to significantly expand my professional network. In the end, I was offered a job in France, within a company Servier, as a Project Lead in the Industrial Development.

Monika

 

Monika, working as research assistant at the University of Exeter (United Kingdom), writes:
The Excellence in Analytical Chemistry program was an extremely valuable experience that increased rapidly the course of my career. Taught by highly competent and respected professors it gives the opportunity to gain all the necessary skills in modern analytical techniques. It has been a pleasant, exceptional experience and honor to be a part of EACH!

Monika is simultaneously pursuing doctoral study at Exeter.

 

Sandy

Sandy, now working in the laboratory of the Akademiska sjukhuset hospital in Uppsala, Sweden, writes:
EACH program was so fruitful. It provided me with the skills needed to kick off my career path by providing a wide range of courses delivered by passionate tutors who really care about your success. Moreover, EACH has wonderful activities like a winter school where you can get knowledge and unforgettable social activities. Thanks to everyone who contributes to the success of EACH!

Rudolf

 

 

Rudolf, now a doctoral student at the Örebro University (Sweden), focusing on analytical chemistry of environmental pollutants, adds:
EACH program exposed us to new (study) environments and without doubt provided an invaluable experience. This project offered me a chance to study a specific field in depth. The obtained skills were crucial for pursuing of third cycle studies. All in all, I got more out of the program than I expected in the beginning.

 

 

The success of our graduates is also the success of the EACH programme! This has also been recognised by the European Commission who has decided to extend the funding of Erasmus Mundus scholarships for the EACH programme.

 

Agnes Heering successfully defended her PhD thesis on experimental realization of the unified pH scale

On December 6, 2017 Agnes Heering, an AMS alumna, successfully defended her PhD thesis titled Experimental realization and applications of the unified acidity scale.

Her work literally redefines the way the pH of non-aqueous and mixed aqueous solution is understood and measured. The main focus of the experiments was on validating the measurement approach and measuring the unified pH values, i.e. pHabs values, of HPLC mobile phases (eluents). Her work introduces a conceptually new approach of measuring pH of mixed-solvent liquid chromatography (LC) mobile phases and has been published in the Analytical Chemistry journal: Unified pH Values of Liquid Chromatography Mobile Phases. Anal. Chem. 2015, 87, 2623–2630.

Mobile phase pH is very important in LC, but its correct measurement is not straightforward and all commonly used approaches have deficiencies. The new and fundamentally correct approach developed by Agnes enables direct comparison of acidities of solutions made in different solvents, based on chemical potential of the proton in the solutions.

The work by Agnes represents the first experimental realization of the pHabs concept using differential potentiometric measurement for comparison of the chemical potentials of the proton in different solutions (connected by a salt bridge), together with earlier published reference points for obtaining the pHabs values (referenced to the gas phase) or pHabsH2O values (referenced to the aqueous solution). The liquid junction potentials were estimated in the framework of Izutsu’s three-component method.
She determined the pHabs values for a number of common LC and LC-MS mobile phases and formed a self-consistent pHabs scale. This scale enables for the first time direct comparison of acidities of any LC mobile phases: with different organic additives, different buffer components etc. Agnes has developed a possible experimental protocol of putting this new approach into chromatographic practice and has tested its applicability. She has demonstrated that the ionization behavior of bases (cationic acids) in the mobile phases can be better predicted by using the pHabsH2O values and aqueous pKa values than by using the alternative means of expressing mobile phase acidity. Description of the ionization behavior of acids on the basis of pHabsH2O values is possible if the change of their pKa values with solvent composition change is taken into account.

The defence was successful in every respect. Agnes presented very well, answered questions confidently and convincingly demonstrated to everyone that she is really on top of this whole matter.

(Photo: Agnes Heering and prof. Peeter Burk, the chairman of the defence committee, during defence)

 

EACH_Erasmus_Mundus_JMDWe are glad to announce that the 2018 admission is officially open to the 4th intake of the Excellence in Analytical Chemistry (EACH) Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree programme!

EACH is a sister-programme of AMS. EACH is an international two-year joint master degree programme that educates specialists in analytical chemistry well qualified to work in industry (food, pharmaceutical, materials, energy, etc), chemical analysis laboratories (environment, food, health, etc) and research (developing new analysis devices or new analysis methods) worldwide. EACH provides knowledge and practical skills in both fundamental and applied aspects of modern analytical chemistry. Practical internship placement in industry or laboratories is an important part of the training.

The programme is suitable both for students who have finished their bachelor’s studies and want to continue in master’s studies, as well as for working analytical chemistry practitioners wishing to spend couple of years to bring their knowledge and skills to a new level.

The programme features generous scholarships as detailed in the Scholarships and tuition fees page.

The programme is taught by four universities: University of Tartu (UT, coordinator), Estonia; Uppsala University (UU), Sweden; University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (UCBL), France; and Åbo Akademi University (AAU), Finland. The language of instruction is English, but students will also learn to communicate in one of the languages of the countries involved.

The online application form, admission requirements, deadlines, list of necessary documents, instructions/explanations, as well as contact data for questions are available from the EACH Admission information page.

We wish you all the success in applying!

 

 

JMS_v52_i10_CoverThe Analytical chemistry group at UT recently received a very pleasant and well-deserved recognition: the paper MALDI‐FT‐ICR‐MS for Archaeological Lipid Residue Analysis J. Mass Spectrom. 2017, 52, 689-700 led by research fellow Dr Ester Oras was selected by the editorial board as the cover article for the Oct 2017 issue of the Journal of Mass Spectrometry!

Ester_OrasEster’s research demonstrates that tiny (and to a large extent degraded) food remains on ceramic potsherds, dating back many hundreds of years, can still tell interesting stories about the food practices of our ancestors. The key to these results is clever usage of high-resolution FT-MS with MALDI ion source.

The developed methodology is expected to lay foundation to further studies of ancient food practices in Europe.

 

(Photo on the left: cover of the Oct 2017 issue of the Journal of Mass Spectrometry; photo on the right: Ester Oras)

 

Validation_of_LC-MS_Methods_Online_CourseWe are glad to announce that the second edition of the online course LC-MS Method Validation is open for registration at the address https://sisu.ut.ee/lcms_method_validation/ !

The course will be offered as a Massive Open On-line Course (MOOC) during Nov 28, 2017 – Feb 09, 2018. This is the second edition of this MOOC and, differently from the last year’s edition, the number of participants is not limited this time. So, whoever is interested is welcome to register!

This is a practice-oriented on-line course on validation of analytical methods, specifically using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as technique, mostly (but not limited to) using the electrospray (ESI) ion source. The course introduces the main concepts and mathematical apparatus of validation, covers the most important method performance parameters and ways of estimating them. The course is largely based on the recently published two-part tutorial review:

The course contains lectures, practical exercises and numerous tests for self-testing. In spite of being introductory, the course intends to offer sufficient knowledge and skills for carrying out validation for most of the common LC-MS analyses in routine laboratory environment. The real-life analysis situations for which there are either examples or self-tests are for example pesticide analyses in fruits and vegetables, perfluororalkyl acids in water, antibiotics in blood serum, glyphosate and AMPA in surface water, etc. It is important to stress, that for successful validation experience (both in analytical chemistry as such and also specifically in validation) is crucial and this can be acquired only through practice.

The course is free of charge. Receiving digital certificate (in the case of successful completion) is also free of charge. Printed certificate (to be sent by post) is available for a fee of 60 EUR. Registration is possible until the start of the course. The course material is available from the above address all the time and can be used via web by anyone who wishes to improve the knowledge and skills in analytical method validation (especially when using LC-ESI-MS).

 

DSC_0294Mass spectrometry is currently probably the No 1 technique for determining trace-level components in complex (especially biomed-related) mixtures. The key issues in such applications are sample preparation, sample introduction to MS and ionization of components of interest (analytes). Big efforts are continually made to improve any of them.

In his recent development – Sponge sprayMax Hecht, an AMS graduate, now PhD student at UT attempts improvements in all of the above issues. The elegant approach proposed by Max utilizes a volumetric sampling device – a hydrophilic sponge, which after absorbing a predetermined amount of sample (e.g. blood or urine), can be directly used for sample introduction to MS and ionizing the analytes.

The seriousness of the work has been demonstrated by the fact that it was accepted for publication by Analytical Chemistry, the top journal in the field. The published article Sponge Spray – Reaching New Dimensions of Direct Sampling and Analysis by MS is now available from the journal website.

Further developments of this approach may lead e.g. to fast medical diagnosis MS methods that, contrary to the current situation with MS in medicine, could be applied as “bed-side” diagnosis tools in hospitals.

(Photo: Max Hecht working with the sponge spray ion source)

 

Introductory_Meeting_with_EACH_and_AMS_Students_2017This week was the first study week for the new students of Applied Measurement Science and EACH Erasmus Mundus Joint Programme. Altogether 23 students started their studies. The countries of origin of the students are Vietnam, Philippines, Hungary, Serbia, Nepal, China, Hong Kong, Georgia, Romania, Mexico, Indonesia, Venezuela, Pakistan and Turkey. During the introductory meeting an overview of the programme was given (see the slides) and a large number of questions were asked and answered, accompanied by tea/coffee and cake.

We wish successful studies to all new students!

 

EACH_Defence_Lyon_2017On September 7, 2017 the second master thesis defence session in the history of the EACH programme took place at University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (UCBL)! Aleksandra Lelevic, Gaurav Bhardwaj, Huian Liu, Marko Jovanovic, Oleksandra Burakhovska, Olivier Etebe Nonga, Rudolf Aro and Tetiana Melnyk successfully defended their master’s theses.

Congratulations to all of you!

The topics of the theses embraced a wide area of modern analytical problems (top-down LC-MS proteomics, industrial process control with gas chromatography and Raman spectrometry, accurate moisture measurement in solids, FT-IR analysis of plasticizers in concrete, etc). The majority of the theses were performed in collaboration with industry. This choice of topics and the long-standing industrial collaboration is rooted in the world-famous industrial analysis and control study direction at UCBL led by prof. Jérôme Randon.

At a small cosy drink after the defence students shared their memories of the study period in Lyon. The students were generally very happy about their study track. They praised especially the long and serious placement in industry, which taught them a wide range of useful skills and enabled establishing many contacts. Students also spoke about their future plans. Several of them have already secured jobs/positions.

On photo from the left: Marko, Jerome (academic coordinator at Lyon), Oleksandra, Olivier, Huian, Aleksandra, Rudolf, Gaurav (Tetiana unfortunately had to leave earlier).

 

Anu_Teearu_Kristjan_HaavThis is the range of topics addressed on Aug 16, 2017 as PhD dissertations addressing these topics were defended at UT Institute of Chemistry.

 

Anu_Teearu_presenting_her_PhD_ThesisAnu Teearu (left on the photo) in her thesis titled Development of MALDI-FT-ICR-MS methodology for the analysis of resinous materials addressed the analysis of resinous materials in order to obtain the maximum amount of high-accuracy data from these complex materials. Several important methodological developments (novel calibrants, novel matrix materials, etc) were introduced to MALDI-FT-ICR-MS and its capabilities were assessed during the analysis of three case study samples originating from different types of cultural heritage objects.

 

Kristja_Haav_presenting_his_PhD_ThesisThe central aim of the thesis of Kristjan Haav Quantitative relative equilibrium constants measurements in supramolecular chemistry was development of highly accurate binding constant measurement methods. The key development was measuring relative equilibrium constants instead of absolute ones, which enables eliminating or strongly reducing the influence on several error sources. Kristjan tested the applicability of this approach on two instrumental techniques: UV-vis spectrophotometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). Comparison of the two – completely independent – techniques showed good agreement between the obtained results and thus supports the reliability of both of them.

Kristjan Haav is an alumnus of the Applied Measurement Science programme.

UT_Students_at_ASC_Summer_School_Druskininkai_2017On Saturday 22.07.2017 The MSC Euromaster Summer School 2017 (Druskininkai, Lithuania) finished. Extensive learning programme combined with a lot of fun, meeting new people and sharing experience. The feedback from some of the UT participants is below and it indicates that the Summer School was again a success!

 

Malika_Beishanova

 

 

Malika Beishanova (Kazakhstan) (photo: taking a water sample for analysis):
MSC Summer School was as much useful as it was fun. The study program was intensive and allowed to review and apply what we have learnt at the EACH program in Tartu as well as gain new knowledge and experience. The two weeks were packed with activities and time flew by so fast. The school is truly international, and the atmosphere extremely friendly. I enjoyed a lot!

 

Nguyen Duc Khanh Tho

 

 

Duc Khan Tho Nguyen (Vietnam) (photo: during lab visit):
It was an excellent summer school ever with so much fun and a lot of works as well. It brought me not only great chance to learn more about Metrology in Analytical Chemistry but also interesting practical works. Our door activities and the trips to different laboratories were also the amazing time. Two weeks passed by in a blink of an eye, but it was just a beginning for the lifetime friendship we have made with so many interesting people. I would like to give a big thank to professor Ivo, professor Philip and all lecturers for providing us such a great opportunity.

Thi Duong Bui

 

Thi Duong Bui (Vietnam) (Photo: group work presentation):
MSC- Summer School 2017 in Druskininkai, Lithuania was the unique and special experience for me. It was a precious chance to practice and revise the knowledge that professor Ivo Leito taught us during the Metrology in Chemistry course and to have a deeper understanding in Metrology and Measurement.
The MSC- Summer School 2017 was far better than what I expected with intensive courses, group works, and individual works. Besides that, I had a really good time with friends from different countries from all over the world, we had great excursions to nature, explored Vilnius, Druskininkai, had fun in the Aqua Park, etc.
Thank you for giving me a good opportunity to participate in the Summer School.

Emeka Emecheta

 

 

Emeka Ephraim Emecheta (Nigeria):
I now feel quite confident as an Analytical chemist having fully participated in this practical oriented programme. I achieved beyond my expectations. However, am earnestly greatful to UT for equipping me with the underlying knowledge about Analytical Measurement which apparently gave me strong advantage during this programme.

 

Jay Pee Ona MSC Summer School

 

 

 

 

Jay Pee Oña (Philippines):
I just wanted to tell you how much I appreciated the opportunity to join the Summer school. It has been an amazing learning experience for me. I was able to meet a fellow Filipino there and I was thinking that since we have the materials we could partner up to open the topic of metrology to a wider audience back at home. Again my sincerest thanks for this opportunity!

 

The 2018 MSC Summer school will take place in Estonia.

 

 

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